Tag Archives: FYI

Time/Mess Saving Tip for Portioning/Pattying Ground Meat For Burgers

6 Apr

*Note:  I copied this directly from my SparkPeople blog, so just ignore the ‘since you’re on SparkPeople’ statement later on in the post.

 

If you’re anything like me, you might run across a few pounds of ground beef on sale, pick it up, come home and stick it in the fridge with every intention of portioning it out before it goes into the freezer, then realizing almost too late that it’s been sitting in the fridge for days, and you don’t have time to portion it right now, so you just toss the whole thing in the freezer to be sorted later.  When later finally rolls around, and you decide you want to make hamburgers out of that thriftily priced protein, you have to haul out this large, frozen lump of ground meat and wait forever and a day for it to thaw, wash your hands, portion it, wash your hands, patty it, wash your hands, then cook it.

While my time saving idea won’t do you much good if you toss the burger in the freezer, it WILL help you save lots of time & mess if you’ll take the initiative to go ahead and portion it straight away.

First, while portioning, rip off a small piece of plastic wrap and cover the weighing portion of your scale with it.  If you have a scale with buttons, pull off another small piece and cover the ON/TARE button.  Now you don’t have to worry about any nasty bacteria because you can simply remove and toss the plastic wrap when you’re finished.

There’s nothing fancy to this part.  I simply weigh out 4 oz amounts of ground beef until the container is gone, putting each one in it’s own zipper lock sandwich baggie.  The last portion very rarely has an even 4 oz, so I like to have a permanent marker on hand to write down the precise weight (I measure almost everything in grams, for more precise calorie counting, but I’m occasionally neurotic, so…).

After everything is weighed and bagged, simply toss into the freezer for when you’re ready to make burgers.

Again, if you’re like me, you grew up eating ‘Momma Burgers’.  You know the kind I mean; they take 15 minutes (if you’re lucky!) to cook, and by the time they’re done, they’ll give you lockjaw just trying to get a bite that includes both sides of the bun, the burger and all the fixins.  This is the precise reason I rarely ever ate burgers-by-mom once I reached a certain age.  While they were delicious, they were just too much of a pain to try to eat.  Hot dogs were just easier.

I’m going on the assumption that if you’re on SparkPeople, you’re not making ‘Momma Burgers’ (a 4 oz serving would more closely resemble ‘Momma Meatballs’!)  so you’re intending a nice, thin, uniform patty.

Pull out your previously portioned burger and thaw.  Open the zippered baggie (but don’t take out the burger yet!), add your desired spices (I prefer garlic powder and onion powder on mine), reseal the baggie, and smoosh the meat around so your seasonings get worked into the meat to your satisfaction (you may find you need to let some of the air out or allow some in, it’s what is easiest for you).  Once you’ve gotten the seasoning worked through the meat, let most of the air out of the baggie and reseal it.

Now make your patty as usual INSIDE THE BAGGIE.

With this method it is quite possible to never touch the meat after you’ve weighed it out after purchase.  I do, because I don’t feel like taking the time to cut the baggie open as I’m putting the patties on the grill or in the pan, but technically, you don’t have to touch it if you don’t want to.

This saves countless minutes of time, especially if you’re trying to make several dishes while you’re making your patties or your phone rings, or you have little ones who need your attention or help, because they’ll always need it once you’ve put your hands in the burger!

Hope you found this tip useful!

~A

Drugs, Dentists and Sleep Deprivation

9 Aug

As I sit here, going on 39 hours without sleep, doped up on Hydrocodone and an extra hole in my head, I realize that this may not be the most opportune time to be posting on my blog, but I’ve really missed you guys, and I’ve really missed sharing with y’all.

For the past five days or so, I’ve had a great blog post topic in my head to write about, and I can’t wait until tonight when I will post it for everyone.  It might be a little out there, but I hope that you will enjoy it or at the very least that it will make you think.

Just wanted to let you all know that I’m still here and that I will be posting later this evening.  It would have been last night, but an unexpected dental emergency left me unable to string my thoughts together enough to make sense.

Until later, my friends!

~A

Technology, Relationships and Night Shift

4 Aug

So, I haven’t posted anything these last couple of days.  My Love is on his long stretch of days off, which means that I’m spending less (read: almost no) time on the computer, and more time interacting with him or cuddled beside him reading a book while he catches up on his man-soaps (read: Wrestling).  I approach these long stretches of time with mixed emotion. Continue reading

What Every Artist Should Know About…

27 Jul
Authenticity

Authenticity (Photo credit: elizabethdunn)

… Certificates of Authenticity.

The other day, I made a blog post about the work I posted on eBay.  A fellow artist who checked out my work commented about their interest in the subject of Certificates of Authenticity, and it gave me the idea that perhaps I should do a post on the subject.

Until I began looking into selling my own art, I had the general idea that Certificates of Authenticity (CoA) were something that accompanied only the truly expensive works of famous artists/works of art which were more likely to be forged and fraudulently sold to unsuspecting buyers, but I discovered I was wrong.  CoA are offered with works of art from all mediums and levels of art, and in the case of certain states (California, for instance, along with several others) CoA are required by law when selling multiples or fine prints(1).   Artists selling their work themselves would benefit from a quick check to find out if and when CoA are required in their own place of residence.

Art is a wide term, covering a multitude of mediums and price ranges.  The more valuable a work and the more famous the artist, the more value a CoA adds.  As with anything of value throughout history, forgeries occur.  Obviously, the more famous the piece/artist, the more cautious one should be about authenticating the work.  Many artists begin as relatively unknown, and therefore do not consider that a CoA is necessary for their work, but those same artists can have no way of knowing if or when their work will become valuable in the market or if, like van Gogh, their fame will occur after their death.  Bearing this in mind, some artists, although currently unknown, feel that offering a CoA with their original pieces, as well as fine/numbered prints, not only adds to the perceived value of their work in the moment, but also adds security to their early works should they ever become sought after.  If you are a fledgling artist (or one beginning to make a name for themselves) and have an interest in providing CoA with your work, you should be aware of what is required for your CoA to be worth the paper it is printed on. Continue reading

Coming Soon: Shout-Outs, FYI’s and (maybe) A Give-Away!

25 Jul

Blog Art Coming Soon

 

Just a quick post to let you guys know what’s coming up.

I won’t be making a ‘regular’ post until Saturday.  Quality time with the better half takes priority, but when I return, I’ve got several things lined up to post about.  Firstly, I’ll be posting about a great blog (Artis, the link is already in the right sidebar if you want a sneak peek), as well as a post about Artwork and Certificates of Authenticity so if you’re an artist, you may want to check that one out!  Also, I’m coming up on 100 followers for my blog, and I’m considering a give-away to celebrate.  I can’t promise that it’s going to be something full of awesomeness, but I’ll be letting you guys know more soon!

See you soon!

~A

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