Tag Archives: Artists

Point Me In The Right Direction?

17 Aug

Hi, guys.  I’m sorry to put this out here on you, but I really don’t know where else to turn.

As you see, I just posted about my art and my decision to donate 25% of my proceeds to charity/acts of kindness.  What I need your help with (in the form of suggestions, tips, pointers, etc.) is how to get people interested enough in my artwork to want to purchase it?

I figured already that I would need to have matted (at the minimum) copies of several pieces to show prospective buyers, but what else can/should I be doing to help generate more sales?  My town doesn’t really have a lot of festivals and things where starving, unknown artists can set up a table and peddle their wares (or if they do, they’ve kept the secret really well!)  I already plan to create a website, also, as soon as I (again!) make enough sales to cover the cost of a domain name and the services of a website designer.

So how about it?  Anyone have any ideas on how to help me generate sales?

The Artist’s Ego – The Disaster of Indifference

29 Jul
Bellagio Artist

Bellagio Artist (Photo credit: metamerist)

The only artists who truly care what no one thinks about their art, whether anyone likes their work, or creates their art  truly for themselves alone, does so in secret.  They do not post pictures of their art, they do not hold showings in galleries, and they do not write down nor record their lyrics or music.  I, on the other hand, do care what others think of my work.  I care if they like it, and I do it for others as much as I do it for myself.  Otherwise, I’d simply delete my photos or toss my drawings in the trash the moment they were done.  I want praise, I want accolades, I want to wallow in the admiration of others for my creation.

Much like a mother preens at compliments about her children, so the artist preens at compliments about their work.

Is it shameful to admit that I seek approval and admiration for my work?  That I seek validation outside myself that what I have created is worth something?  I don’t believe so, but many do.  Perhaps it’s to protect their admittedly (or not) fragile egos from the sometimes harsh criticisms?  If they say they don’t care long and loud enough, perhaps one day it might be true? Continue reading

What Every Artist Should Know About…

27 Jul
Authenticity

Authenticity (Photo credit: elizabethdunn)

… Certificates of Authenticity.

The other day, I made a blog post about the work I posted on eBay.  A fellow artist who checked out my work commented about their interest in the subject of Certificates of Authenticity, and it gave me the idea that perhaps I should do a post on the subject.

Until I began looking into selling my own art, I had the general idea that Certificates of Authenticity (CoA) were something that accompanied only the truly expensive works of famous artists/works of art which were more likely to be forged and fraudulently sold to unsuspecting buyers, but I discovered I was wrong.  CoA are offered with works of art from all mediums and levels of art, and in the case of certain states (California, for instance, along with several others) CoA are required by law when selling multiples or fine prints(1).   Artists selling their work themselves would benefit from a quick check to find out if and when CoA are required in their own place of residence.

Art is a wide term, covering a multitude of mediums and price ranges.  The more valuable a work and the more famous the artist, the more value a CoA adds.  As with anything of value throughout history, forgeries occur.  Obviously, the more famous the piece/artist, the more cautious one should be about authenticating the work.  Many artists begin as relatively unknown, and therefore do not consider that a CoA is necessary for their work, but those same artists can have no way of knowing if or when their work will become valuable in the market or if, like van Gogh, their fame will occur after their death.  Bearing this in mind, some artists, although currently unknown, feel that offering a CoA with their original pieces, as well as fine/numbered prints, not only adds to the perceived value of their work in the moment, but also adds security to their early works should they ever become sought after.  If you are a fledgling artist (or one beginning to make a name for themselves) and have an interest in providing CoA with your work, you should be aware of what is required for your CoA to be worth the paper it is printed on. Continue reading

The Helping Hands Project – Artists Unite!

26 Jul
Help Others

Help Others (Photo credit: Keoki Seu)

Please allow me a moment if you would, to introduce you to a fellow artist.

Born in Iceland in 1969, Artis considers himself a ‘visual artist’ and I would have to agree.  His photography is certainly a visual delight.  He’s spent a lifetime developing his personal style, which he calls ‘No-Rule Art’, about which he says, “I simply make my own path without any particular rules or guidelines. In that way I feel free in my creation of my work.”  As a producer of high quality photo art from Scandinavia and Europe, his love for not only his art medium, but for his subjects is made obvious in both the words he writes, and his work on display.

What differentiates Artis from the thousands of other blogs on the internet? you may ask.  His difference is in the way he has approached the dilemma we bloggers/artists face; that of being one of a million faces in a crowd.  I ran across his blog by seeing a post he had written, calling artists- whether you create your art with a camera, a paintbrush, or a typewriter- to come together and help one another.  To reach out a hand to others, and help promote and share our work as a united group, using our blogs to help spread exposure for one another; to share with our readers a glimpse of art/artists that they otherwise may not have run across in this enormous world of the internet. Continue reading

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